Santa Cruz mountain dam demolition benefits endangered salmon

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Removing the century-old dam in Santa Cruz County benefits endangered fish by providing habitat for spawning. The dismantling of the Milk Creek Dam opens the door that has been closed for more than 100 years to endangered fish like coho salmon. The salmon spawn upstream. Heavy equipment was brought in this week to remove the Milk Creek Dam. Ian Rowbotham, head of land management at the Semperbilence Foundation, said the key to the project was the release of old sediment trapped behind the dam. It is described as the enduring limestone rock that coho salmon depend on. This is the side that was missing downstream from the dam. Salmon can rely on gravel and sand to lay eggs and become the next generation of fish, ”says Robosum. Monterey Bay Salmon & Trout Project We release 25,000 coho salmon hatcheries each year. Anything that helps them survive is welcome. “It’s a big problem for us. All kinds of obstacles that hinder the passage of fish in the Santa Cruz Mountains are being resolved and we are trying to remove those barriers. It helps the movement of the fish, ”he said. Ben Harris, executive director of the Monterey Bay Salmon & Trout Project, also brought some good news this week. Juvenile coho salmon survived for two years in a freshwater stream along the north coast. “We are seeing more coho salmon in monitoring activities, and as we work locally, it is important that other watersheds are functioning. The milk leaks are adjacent to the Laguna stream. In these ponds, the fish can go back and forth, ”said Chris Berry, pond compliance manager.

Removing a century-old dam in Santa Cruz County will provide nesting habitat for endangered fish.

The dismantling of the Milk Leak Dam opens the door, closed for more than 100 years, to endangered fish that spawn upstream, such as coho salmon.

Heavy equipment was brought in this week to remove the Milk Creek Dam.

“The dam would have straddled the creek there, so I could pull the sediment out from behind the dam, lift it up, and move it around so the creek could flow unimpeded.” Said Ian Rowbotham, land stewardship manager of the Sempervirens Fund. ..

The key to this project was to free the old sediment trapped behind the dam.

It is said to be a durable limestone rock that coho salmon rely on.

“It’s important because it’s a missing aspect downstream of the dam here. Salmon rely on gravel and sand to be able to lay eggs and become the next generation of fish. Rowbotham said.

The Monterey Bay Salmon and Trout Project releases 25,000 hatches of coho salmon each year.

Anything that helps them survive is a welcome addition.

“It’s a big problem for us. We try to tackle all kinds of obstacles in the Santa Cruz Mountains fishways, and that helps remove those obstacles to the movement of fish, ”General Secretary Ben Harris said in Monterey. The Bay Salmon & Trout Project said.

The Santa Cruz Water Services Department also brought good news this week.

Juvenile coho salmon survived in freshwater streams along the north coast for the second year in a row.

“It is important that other watersheds are functioning due to the increasing numbers of coho salmon in monitoring activities and activities in the region. The milk leaks are adjacent to the Laguna stream. In these watersheds, fish come and go. You may have moved, ”said the basin’s compliance officer. Chris Berry.

Milk leaks have been modest so far, but will increase over time, and conservationists hope to increase the numbers of endangered coho salmon and rainbow trout.

Dam demolition in Santa Cruz Mountains benefits endangered salmon Source link Dam demolition in Santa Cruz Mountains benefits endangered salmon


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