Mainer has spent 20 years restoring the Atlantic salmon population

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A Mainer has worked to restore the Atlantic salmon population which is vital to our ecosystem. After 20 years of hard work, Paul Christman has the numbers to prove the salmon is back. Christman received the 2022 Trout Unlimited Conservation Professional Award. “I didn’t do this alone. I had a small but great team working here,” Christmas said. , there were no Atlantic salmon up there. Now there are tens of thousands of them.” Christman focused as much as possible on the lack of a human equation in his project, focusing instead on fish eggs.”In the early to mid-2000s, we were really working on technology to bring salmon into the watershed via eggs,” Christman said.The process involves planting the salmon eggs in the sediments at the bottom of the river during the winter months. Over a million eggs have been donated to the project for reintroduction purposes. Once the fish begin to migrate, “There’s a lift to fish on the Kennebec River which can catch migrating salmon upstream and t of other species,” Christman said. “Adults that come in – we’re removing scales from these fish that look a lot like, ‘They’re also trying to restore a number of other fish. “We’re trying to bring the herring back. We’re trying to give all of these species an opportunity to thrive in the watershed for the bigger picture of the ecosystem,” Christman said. He says the reason for the decline in populations comes back to the humans. They had to take over those watersheds, and because of the barriers, they vomited out most of the populations in Maine are gone,” Christman said. Now that there are more fish in the river, he said that it was helping the whole ecosystem. saw a lot more eagles, I suspect we’re feeding that part of the ecosystem as well,” Christman said. He said that without the help of volunteers and his crews , none of this would be possible.

A Mainer has worked to restore the Atlantic salmon population which is vital to our ecosystem.

After 20 years of hard work, Paul Christman has the numbers to prove the salmon is back. Christman received the 2022 Trout Unlimited Professional Conservation Award.

“I didn’t do this alone. I had a small but great team working here,” Christmas said. “When we started 20 years ago, there were no Atlantic salmon up there. Now there are tens of thousands.

Christman focused on keeping the human equation out of his project as much as possible, instead focusing on fish eggs.

“In the early to mid-2000s, we were really working on the technology to bring Atlantic salmon into the watershed via eggs,” Christman said.

The process involves planting the salmon eggs in the sediment at the bottom of the river during the winter months.

Over one million eggs have been donated to the project for reintroduction. Once the fish start migrating, they start being tracked.

“There is a fish lift on the Kennebec River that can catch migrating salmon upstream and other species,” Christman said. “The adults that come in – we pull scales off of these fish that look a lot like tree rings. You can look at the growth and from that growth we can determine the origin.

They are also trying to restore a number of other fish.

“We are trying to bring back the herring. We’re trying to give all of these species the opportunity to thrive in the watershed for the bigger picture of the ecosystem,” Christman said.

He says the reason for declining populations lies with humans.

“They took over the watershed, they needed hydroelectricity, mills and navigation. They had to take over those watersheds, and because of the barriers, they threw up most of the populations in Maine disappeared,” Christman said.

Now that there are more fish in the river, he said it helps the whole ecosystem.

“We saw a lot more eagles, I suspect we’re feeding that part of the ecosystem as well,” Christman said.

He said that without the help of volunteers and his teams, none of this would be possible.

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